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Treatments Offered

Urethral Operations ►

  • Urethral or Meatal Dilatation - an operation to dilate strictures or narrowing sections of the urethra. This is often performed under a short general anaesthetic. Occasionally a stricture will need to be ‘cut’ open and this called ‘urethrotomy’

Prostate Operations ►

  • Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP) - uses a telescope passed down the urethra to cut away prostate tissue causing an obstruction to the urinary flow with an electric loop. It is performed in men with BPH (benign prostatic enlargement) to improve the urinary flow or to prevent complications of BPH such as recurrent urinary infections, bladder stones and kidney damage. A catheter is temporarily placed after the procedure.
  • Plasmakinetic TURP (TURIS system) - similar to a standard TURP but uses a plasmakinetic energy to cut or vaporise benign prostatic tissue. The irrigant fluid is saline and this means that the procedure is well suited to men with large prostates, as it allows more tissue to be removed.
  • Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate (HoLEP) - similar to a standard TURP but uses energy from a laser to cut or vaporize benign prostatic tissue. The irrigant fluid is saline and this means that the procedure is well suited to men with large prostates and it allows more tissue to be removed.

Scrotal Operations ►

  • Vasovasostomy - an operation for vasectomy reversal. Generally vasectomy is an irreversible procedure however vasovasostomy can restore fertility in some men. The operation requires the use of an operating microscope or magnified lens so that the two narrow ends of the vas can be joined together again. This treatment is not available to NHS patients.
  • Hydrocoele repair - an operation to drain fluid from around the testicle through an incision in the scrotal skin. The bag of tissue that contained the fluid is everted or excised so the fluid collection is less likely to recur in the future. This is performed under a short general anaesthetic on a day surgery basis.
  • Excision of an Epididymal Cyst - the epididymal cyst is excised from the scrotum through an incision of the scrotal skin. This is performed under a short general anaesthetic on a day surgery basis.
  • Excision of Skin Lesions

Penile Operations ►

  • Circumcision - an operation to remove the foreskin performed under local or general anaesthetic, usually on a day case basis.
  • Frenuloplasty - an operation to modify the retraction of the foreskin in order to make it more comfortable to retract. This procedure is performed under local or general anaesthetic, usually on a day case basis.
  • Prepucioplasty - an operation to reconfigure the foreskin in order to make it less tight and more comfortable to retract. This procedure is performed under local or general anaesthetic, usually on a day case basis.
  • Excision of Skin lesions

Bladder Procedures and Operations ►

  • Transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) - an operation under general anaesthetic to cut away a tumour from the inside of the bladder wall using a telescope. The telescope is passed down the urethra and the bladder is filled with fluid first. An electric loop is used for the cutting and a catheter is temporarily placed after the procedure.
  • Cystodiathermy of a bladder tumour – small bladder tumours may be cauterised under local anaesthetic or a short general anaesthetic. This is usually performed in a day case setting.

Operations and Procedures for Kidney Stones ►

  • Ureteroscopy +/- Biopsies, Laser fragmentation of stone and removal of stone fragments - a narrow rigid or flexible telescope is used to negotiate the narrow passageways of the urinary tract. There are no cuts in the skin required. A laser device is used to break the stone into small pieces, which then pass naturally or are removed piece by piece. Occasionally a plastic tube called a ureteric stent will need to stay inside the body for a period of time to help healing after surgery and to allow stone fragments to pass.
  • Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) - a ‘keyhole’ operation used to remove large stones from the hollow centre of the kidney. Access to the kidney, though a narrow needle via the loin, is made so that a telescope can be introduced. A ballistic device is used to break the large stone into smaller pieces, which are then plucked out of the kidney. This is a major operation but it is very effective in removing all the stone in a single go.
  • Extra Corporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) - this technology uses ‘shock waves’ (like sound waves) to break kidney stones into small fragments. The shock waves are generated by a machine and then transmitted to the body, focused on to the kidney stone. The fragments are then passed in the urine. A series of treatments are usually required. ESWL is performed in the day surgery unit.
  • Laser Cystolitholapaxy - an operation to break up a sizable bladder stone using a telescope and a laser is performed under a general anaesthetic. A catheter is temporarily placed after the procedure.

Treatments for Erectile Dysfunction (impotence) ►

  • Pharmacotherapy - a range of medical treatments is available for the treatment of erectile dysfunction after assessment by a urologist. Such treatments include Viagra type drugs. Other drugs are available and vacuum devices are also highly effective in patients that wish to avoid taking drugs or for whom such drugs are not appropriate.

For more detailed information on these procedures or operations, including complications, please refer to the patient specific information sheets and videos available as a public resource on the BAUS website: www.baus.org.uk/patients/patient+information